What to consider when buying promotional products. Part 2

Does the promotional product you’ve selected position your company in a unique, attention-getting matter  The more attention, the more talk, and the more potential for generating business from your effort.

 

For example, a new radio station gave away a Prime Line radio imprinted with their logo. Each radio dial is set to the new stations number to further reinforce listener-ship. At a small cost of only $3.95 to $5.95 each, this was a clever, direct method to lure new listeners to the new radio station. Just as effective was the new computer store that gave away the Prime Line modem phone cord.

 

One of my favorite merchandise-driven promotions was launched by the Rhode Island Medical Society. They sent out Tee Off golf balls in a prescription bottle to their doctors. Costs varied – $5.50 to $11.50 – due to the quality rage of golf balls available to them.

 

The focus on practical items that your clients will use over and over serves your marketing efforts better and better. Case in point, your company sends out a CD with a Happy Holiday message on it from your staff. The same CD includes an hour of popular Holiday Tunes. The CDs go out with a great gadget called the iSlice. It is a hip looking CD opener with a ceramic blade that rips open CD packaging without effort. It is the type of item your customers will use again and again.



Selecting the appropriate corporate merchandise to represent your brand should be considered an important aspect of your company’s marketing plan and strategic brand building campaign. To that end, work with a qualified promotional product distributor – a brand partner – that understands the dynamics of merchandising and marketing.